Metro Nashville Public Schools

Failing Report Card

We all knew that our children got grades, but we found out that teachers and schools get grades too. Nashville has 21 schools on the Tennessee Department of Education’s priority (failing) list. Priority schools are either in the bottom 5% or have graduation rates lower than 67%. Seventy-eight out of 100 of high school students did not meet standards to graduate high school. If our children are failing, it’s because the system is failing to provide them the quality teachers and resources they need to learn.
Listen to PROPEL leaders Sonya Thomas and Vesia Hawkins featured in “What the Words Say” – an audio documentary produced by APM Reports about the struggle of Black children and the inequalities of getting help.

Whites Creek High School

650+ students
80 % Black
6% Hispanic
Economically disadvantaged: 80%

6
STUDENTS CAN DO GRADE LEVEL ENGLISH
24.1
READY TO GRADUATE

Jere Baxter Middle School

260+ students
97 % Black
2% Hispanic
Economically disadvantaged: 100%

5.8
STUDENTS READING ON GRADE LEVEL
5.9
STUDENTS CAN DO GRADE LEVEL MATH

Tom Joy Elementary School

353+ students
58% Black
21% Hispanic
Economically Disadvantaged: 94%

2
STUDENTS CAN DO GRADE LEVEL MATH

Amqui Elementary School

432+ students
40% Black
39% Hispanic
Economically disadvantaged: 95%

10.4
STUDENTS READING ON GRADE LEVEL
15
STUDENTS CAN DO GRADE LEVEL MATH

Knowledge Academy (Charter School)

290+ students
22% Black
49% Hispanic
Economically disadvantaged: 93%

16
STUDENTS CAN DO GRADE LEVEL ENGLISH
20
STUDENTS CAN DO GRADE LEVEL MATH

“"The human case calls for a need to ensure that MNPS students, especially those living in poverty, have an educational pathway to economic security and stability. The structural and systemic barriers that keep many from a pathway to the middle class have a profound impact on families, schools, and communities."”

Nashville Chamber of CommerceEducation Report Card

“"No student should have to go outside of their neighborhood for a high-quality education, but advocacy groups and local media have highlighted the disparities between schools in affluent communities and those in distressed neighborhoods."”

Nashville Chamber of CommerceEducation Report Card